Effects of threat to a valued social identity on implicit self-esteem and discrimination


Smurda J., Wittig M., GÖKALP G.

GROUP PROCESSES & INTERGROUP RELATIONS, vol.9, no.2, pp.181-197, 2006 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 9 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/1368430206062076
  • Journal Name: GROUP PROCESSES & INTERGROUP RELATIONS
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.181-197
  • Keywords: implicit self-esteem, intergroup bias, intergroup discrimination, self-esteem hypothesis, social identity theory, ULTIMATE ATTRIBUTION ERROR, ASSOCIATION TEST, INTERGROUP DIFFERENTIATION, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, EXPLICIT MEASURES, PREJUDICE, ATTITUDES, CONSEQUENCES, COGNITION, MALLEABILITY

Abstract

This research provides an experimental test of the self-esteem hypothesis that avoids potential hypothesis guessing and self-presentational concerns associated with previous research by including subtle measures of both social self-esteem and intergroup discrimination. The role of group identification and social self-esteem as determinants of ingroup bias was examined under high and low identity-threatening conditions utilizing an implicit measure of social self-esteem. Participants read a fictitious statement indicating whether their university received a good or bad evaluation relative to a rival university and then made attributions for this situation. High group identifiers had a greater decrease in implicit social self-esteem after a threat than low group identifiers did and they displayed the greatest ingroup favoritism. Greater ingroup-serving bias was associated with a subsequent increase in implicit social self-esteem.