DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF SCIENCE HOMEWORK SCALE FOR MIDDLE-SCHOOL STUDENTS


Taş Y., Sungur S., Öztekin C.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION, vol.14, pp.417-444, 2016 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 14
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s10763-014-9582-5
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.417-444
  • Keywords: feedback on homework, homework quality, homework self-regulation, middle school, science, ACHIEVEMENT GOALS, PROCRASTINATION, ASSIGNMENTS, MOTIVATION, COMPONENTS, AVOIDANCE, PREDICT, MODEL, TASK

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop and validate Science Homework Scale (SHS) which assesses middle-school (grades 6-8) students' perceptions of teachers' homework practices and homework self-regulation in science. Students' perceptions of teachers' homework practices included homework quality and feedback on homework while students' homework self-regulation consisted of homework goal orientations (i.e. mastery, performance, and work-avoidance), homework strategy use (i.e. deep learning and management), and homework procrastination; 3 studies were conducted with 7th-grade Turkish students. In study 1 (n = 618), the data were analyzed through exploratory factor analyses. In study 2 (n = 758), in order to test the hypothesized factor structure, the data were subjected to confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). Goodness-of-fit indices indicated good model fit and Cronbach alpha reliabilities of subscales ranged from 0.77 to 0.96. Additionally, multi-group CFAs supported factorial invariance of SHS across boys and girls. In the 3rd study (n = 8318), CFA results supported 8-factor structure. Next, a homework model which suggested relationships among students' perceptions of teachers' homework practices, homework self-regulation, and achievement was proposed. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses results revealed that students' perceptions of homework quality and feedback on homework were associated with homework self-regulation components which in turn related to science achievement.