The relationship between Turkish children's perceptions of marital conflict and their internalizing and externalizing problems


Ulu I., Fisiloglu H.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, cilt.37, ss.369-378, 2002 (SSCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 37 Konu: 6
  • Basım Tarihi: 2002
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1080/00207590244000188
  • Dergi Adı: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.369-378

Özet

The present study investigated the relationship between children's perceptions of marital conflict and children's internalizing and externalizing problems. Additionally, investigating gender and age differences in children's perceptions and the type of problems they exhibited were the other purposes of the study. The sample consisted of 9- to 12-year-old, nonclinical children from intact families (N = 232), one of their parents, and teachers. The data were gathered by administering the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 4-18 and the Teacher's Report Form to adult participants and the Children's Perception of Interparental Conflict Scale and the Children's Depression Inventory to the child participants. Findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between children's perceptions of marital conflict and their internalizing and externalizing problems. More specifically, children's perceptions of conflict properties were associated with their internalizing problems in parents', teachers', and children's reports. Children's perceptions of threat were associated with child-reported depression. Children's perceptions of self-blame were associated with child-reported depression, parent-reported internalizing and externalizing problems, and teacher-reported externalizing problems. Furthermore, it was found that there were gender and age differences in children's perceptions of marital conflict and their internalizing and externalizing problems. Findings indicated that boys have higher self-blame scores and teacher-reported externalizing problems than girls and that girls have more parent- and teacher-reported internalizing problems than boys. Additionally, it was found that 9-year-old children have more teacher-reported internalizing and externalizing problems than 12-year-old children. Also, 9-year-old boys have higher parent-reported externalizing problems than 9-year-old girls and 9-year-old boys have higher parent-reported externalizing problems than 12-year-old boys.