Kinematic and Kinetostatic Analysis of Parallel Manipulators with Emphasis on Position, Motion, and Actuation Singularities


ÖZGÖREN M. K.

ROBOTICA, cilt.37, ss.599-625, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 37 Konu: 4
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1017/s0263574718001194
  • Dergi Adı: ROBOTICA
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.599-625

Özet

This paper provides a contribution to the singularity analysis of the parallel manipulators by introducing the position singularities in addition to the motion and actuation singularities. The motion singularities are associated with the linear velocity mapping between the task and joint spaces. So, they are the singularities of the relevant Jacobian matrices. On the other hand, the position singularities are associated with the nonlinear position mapping between the task and joint spaces. So, they are encountered in the position-level solutions of the forward and inverse kinematics problems. In other words, they come out irrespective of the velocity mapping and the Jacobian matrices. Considering these distinctions, a kinematic singularity is denoted here by one of the four acronyms, which are PSFK (position singularity of forward kinematics), PSIK (position singularity of inverse kinematics), MSFK (motion singularity of forward kinematics), and MSIK (motion singularity of inverse kinematics). There may also occur an actuation singularity (ACTS) concerning the kinetostatic relationships that involve forces and moments. However, it is verified that an ACTS is the same as an MSFK. Each singularity induces different consequences in the joint and task spaces. A PSFK imposes a constraint on the active joint variables and makes the end-effector position indefinite and uncontrollable. Therefore, it must be avoided. An MSFK imposes a constraint on the rates of the active joint variables and makes the end-effector motion indefinite and easily perturbable. Besides, since it is also an ACTS, it causes the actuator torques or forces to grow without bound. Therefore, it must also be avoided. On the other hand, a PSIK imposes a constraint on the end-effector position but provides freedom for the active joint variables. Similarly, an MSIK imposes a constraint on the end-effector motion but provides freedom for the rates of the active joint variables. A PSIK or MSIK need not be avoided if the constraint it imposes on the position or motion of the end-effector is acceptable or if the task can be planned to be compatible with that constraint. Besides, with such a compatible task, a PSIK or MSIK may even be advantageous, because the freedom it provides for the active joint variables can sometimes be used for a secondary purpose. This paper is also concerned with the multiplicities of forward kinematics in the assembly modes of the manipulator and the multiplicities of inverse kinematics in the posture modes of the legs. It is shown that the assembly mode changing poses of the manipulator are the same as the MSFK poses, and the posture mode changing poses of the legs are the same as the MSIK poses.