Acculturation and suicidal ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands


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Eylem O., DALĞAR İ., Ince B. U. , Tok F., van Straten A., de Wit L., ...More

PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH, vol.275, pp.71-77, 2019 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 275
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.02.078
  • Journal Name: PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.71-77
  • Keywords: Migration, Participation, Maintenance, Secure attachment, Hopelessness, Turkish, ATTACHMENT STYLES, SOCIAL SUPPORT, WEST LONDON, ATTITUDES, BEHAVIOR, HOPELESSNESS, ADOLESCENTS, ADAPTATION, MIGRATION, CULTURE
  • Middle East Technical University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

More suicidal ideation and higher rates of attempted suicide are found in Turkish people when compared with the general population in Europe. Acculturation processes and related distress may explain an elevated risk of suicide. The current study investigates the association between acculturation and suicidal ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands. The mediating effect of hopelessness and moderating effect of secure attachment are also examined. A total of 185 Turkish migrants living in the Netherlands were recruited through social media and through liaison with community groups. They completed an online survey including validated measures of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, acculturation and attachment style. Mediation and moderation analyses were tested using bootstrapping. Higher participation was associated with less hopelessness and less suicidal ideation. Greater maintenance of ones ethnic culture was associated with higher hopelessness and higher suicidal ideation. Greater participation was associated with less suicidal ideation particularly amongst those with less secure attachment styles. Turkish migrants who participate in the host culture may have a lower risk of developing suicidal thinking. Participation may protect against suicidal thinking, particularly among those with less secure attachment styles.