Investigating the uptake and acquisition of potentially toxic elements in plants and health risks associated with the addition of fresh biowaste amendments to industrially contaminated soil


Yousaf B. , Liu G., Abbas Q., Wang R., Imtiaz M., Zia-ur-Rehman M.

LAND DEGRADATION & DEVELOPMENT, vol.28, no.8, pp.2596-2607, 2017 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 28 Issue: 8
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1002/ldr.2821
  • Title of Journal : LAND DEGRADATION & DEVELOPMENT
  • Page Numbers: pp.2596-2607
  • Keywords: biowaste amendments, health risks, industrially contaminated soil, potentially toxic elements, HEAVY-METAL ACCUMULATION, ORGANIC AMENDMENTS, DIETARY EXPOSURE, TRACE-ELEMENTS, URBAN, BIOAVAILABILITY, VEGETABLES, CONSUMPTION, BIOACCESSIBILITY, MINERALIZATION

Abstract

Soil contamination by potentially toxic elements (PTEs), due to rapid industrialization and urbanization, is a serious environmental concern that has been threatening both the sustainability of various agroecosystems and human health. Efforts to investigate the bioavailability, transfer, and accumulation of PTEs in the soil-plant system and their possible health consequences have almost exclusively focused in the past studies. However, there is limited evidence for increased human exposure to PTEs through dietary intake of food crop grown on contaminated soil influenced by fresh biowaste amendments (FBAs). Here, we show that FBAs addition to soil markedly (p.01) intensified human exposure to PTEs through impacts on solubility, uptake, and bioaccumulation compared with the control. In general, the risk assessment performed indicated that the hazard index values for FBAs treatments were notably higher than that of control; however, these were shown to be less than the legal limit (<1). In addition, the lifetime risks of developing carcinogenicity from exposure to PTEs were far above the maximum regulatory limits (1.00E-06), indicating that remarkable (p.01) amount of PTEs was transferred to food with the addition of FBAs. Conclusively, these results suggest that the use of FBAs to contaminated soil aggravates health risks of PTEs through wheat consumption. Further studies, which incorporate the in vitro gastrointestinal bioaccessibility, should be conducted to heighten our understanding about PTEs exposure and the risks associated with FBAs addition to contaminated soil.