Probing Charge Transfer and Hot Carrier Dynamics in Organic Solar Cells with Terahertz Spectroscopy


CUNNINGHAM P. D. , LANE P. A. , MELINGER J. S. , ESENTÜRK O. , HEILWEIL E. J.

Conference on Terahertz Physics, Devices, and Systems X - Advanced Applications in Industry and Defense, Maryland, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri, 17 - 19 Nisan 2016, cilt.9856 identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 9856
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1117/12.2228379
  • Basıldığı Şehir: Maryland
  • Basıldığı Ülke: Amerika Birleşik Devletleri

Özet

Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (alpha-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C-60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C-60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multi layer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C-60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they theunalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C-60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in alpha-6T/C-60, where hole transfer takes place from a theunalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.