THE ANARCHY OF JUSTICE: HESIOD’S CHAOS, ANAXIMANDER’S APEIRON, AND GEOMETRIC THOUGHT


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Griffith J. E. C.

KİLİKYA JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY, no.1, pp.1-16, 2022 (Peer-Reviewed Journal)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Journal Name: KİLİKYA JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY
  • Journal Indexes: Philosopher's Index, TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.1-16

Abstract

This article examines Hesiod’s Chaos and Anaximander’s apeiron individually and in
relation to each other through the frame of René Descartes’ notion of natural geometry and
through bounds and limits in Euclid and Immanuel Kant. Thanks to this frame, it shows that, in
his poetic vision, Hesiod saw in Chaos the act of bounding such that different things can appear
while, in his speculative vision, Anaximander saw in the apeiron the self-limiting limit of
bounded things, which is to say, time as distinct from the temporality of bounded things
resulting from Chaos. Thus, together, Chaos and the apeiron present the spatiotemporal order of
the world. Finally, delving further into Anaximander’s fragment shows that the justice (dike)
ruling over all includes the apeiron as the time foundational to temporality, meaning justice is
without foundation and therefore anarchic.