Selenophene-Modified Boron Dipyrromethene-Based Photosensitizers Exhibit Photodynamic Inhibition on a Broad Range of Bacteria


ÖZKETEN A. Ç. , KARAMAN O., Ozdemir A., Soysal I., KIZILENİŞ Ç., Chatzioglou A. N. , ...More

ACS OMEGA, vol.7, pp.33916-33925, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 7
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1021/acsomega.2c02868
  • Journal Name: ACS OMEGA
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Directory of Open Access Journals
  • Page Numbers: pp.33916-33925
  • Middle East Technical University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Microorganisms are crucial for human survival in view of both mutualistic and pathogen interactions. The control of the balance could be achieved by use of the antibiotics. There is a continuous arms race that exists between the pathogen and the antibiotics. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria threatens health even for insignificant injuries. However, the discovery of new antibiotics is not a fast process, and the healthcare system will suffer if the evolution of MDR lingers in its current frequency. The cationic photosensitizers (PSs) provide a unique approach to develop novel, light-inducible antimicrobial drugs. Here, we examine the antimicrobial activity of innovative selenophene-modified boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based PSs on a variety of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. The candidates demonstrate a level of confidence in both light-dependent and independent inhibition of bacterial growth. Among them, selenophene conjugated PS candidates (BOD-Se and BOD-Se-I) are promising agents to induce photodynamic inhibition (PDI) on all experimented bacteria: E. coli, S. aureus, B. cereus, and P. aeruginosa. Further characterizations revealed that photocleavage ability on DNA molecules could be potentially advantageous over extracellular DNA possessing biofilm-forming bacteria such as B. cereus and P. aeruginosa. Microscopy analysis with fluorescent BOD-H confirmed the colocalization on GFP expressing E. coli.