Decreased Staphylococcus aureus and increased osteoblast density on nanostructured electrophoretic-deposited hydroxyapatite on titanium without the use of pharmaceuticals


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Mathew D., Bhardwaj G., Wang Q., Sun L., Ercan B., Geetha M., ...More

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NANOMEDICINE, vol.9, pp.1775-1781, 2014 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 9
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Doi Number: 10.2147/ijn.s55733
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NANOMEDICINE
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.1775-1781

Abstract

Background: Plasma-spray deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium (Ti) has proven to be a suboptimal solution to improve orthopedic-implant success rates, as demonstrated by the increasing number of orthopedic revision surgeries due to infection, implant loosening, and a myriad of other reasons. This could be in part due to the high heat involved during plasma-spray deposition, which significantly increases hydroxyapatite crystal growth into the nonbiologically inspired micron regime. There has been a push to create nanotopographies on implant surfaces to mimic the physiological nanostructure of native bone and, thus, improve osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions and inhibit bacteria functions. Among the several techniques that have been adopted to develop nanocoatings, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an attractive, versatile, and effective material-processing technique.