The Role of Need Satisfaction in Self-Concealment and Well-Being


Uysal A., LIN H. L. , KNEE C. R.

PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN, vol.36, no.2, pp.187-199, 2010 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 36 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/0146167209354518
  • Journal Name: PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.187-199
  • Keywords: self-concealment, self-determination, need satisfaction, well-being, secrecy, CONCEPTUALIZATION, COMPETENCE, MOTIVATION, AUTONOMY, STIGMA, SECRET, CANT

Abstract

The present research tests a model derived from self-determination theory to explain why self-concealment (the tendency to keep distressing personal information secret) is associated with negative well-being outcomes. Two studies tested a model in which self-concealment predicts the thwarting of basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness, which then results in negative psychological outcomes. Study 1 involved a cross-sectional design. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that the model provided an acceptable fit to the data. Study 2 involved a multilevel design. Participants completed daily measures of self-concealment, need satisfaction, and well-being over 16 days. Results supported the proposed mediation model. Furthermore, the associations between daily self-concealment, daily need satisfaction, and daily well-being were independent of trait self-concealment. Overall, the findings suggest that concealing personal distressing information is detrimental to the satisfaction of basic psychological needs, which in turn predicts negative well-being.