Masculinity, femininity, and angry drivers: Masculinity and femininity as moderators between driver anger and anger expression style among young drivers


Deniz P. , Lajunen T., Özkan T. , Gaygısız E.

Accident Analysis and Prevention, vol.161, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SSCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 161
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.aap.2021.106347
  • Title of Journal : Accident Analysis and Prevention
  • Keywords: Driving anger, Anger expression, Gender roles, Femininity, Masculinity, DRIVING ANGER, GENDER-ROLES, PERSONALITY PREDICTORS, TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS, SEX-DIFFERENCES, RISKY BEHAVIOR, AGGRESSION, INVENTORY, TRAIT, AGE

Abstract

© 2021 The Author(s)Driver anger and its expression are among the most studied topics in traffic safety literature. However, the function of gender roles, i.e., masculinity and femininity, in driving anger experience and expression has remained mainly unexplored. The present study investigates the association between driving anger and gender roles on the expression of anger among young drivers. Three hundred seventy-nine young drivers filled a questionnaire including the Driving Anger Scale, Bem Sex Roles Inventory, Driving Anger Expression Inventory, and demographic information. Moderated regression analyses showed that masculine gender role and anger provoked by other road users’ discourtesy were positively and femininity negatively related to verbal aggression while driving. Anger related to police presence, slow driving, and masculine gender role were positively related to gesture-based and vehicle-based expression of driver aggression. Hostility and feminine gender role were negatively related to the gesture-based expression of driver aggression, while anger related to witnessing illegal driving and feminine gender role were negatively related to the vehicle-based expression of aggression. The interaction effects between masculinity and hostility, masculinity and slow driving, and femininity and illegal driving were also found on the gesture-based expression of driver aggression. The effects of interaction between masculinity and slow driving and femininity and illegal driving were also found on the vehicle-based expression of driver aggression. Slow driving and femininity had a positive relationship to the adaptive expression of anger in driving. The results suggest that masculinity and femininity moderate the relationship between driving anger and the expression of driving anger among young drivers.