NOVEL IMPEDANCE TUNER, PHASE SHIFTER, AND VECTOR MODULATORS USING RF MEMS TECHNOLOGY


Thesis Type: Doctorate

Institution Of The Thesis: Orta Doğu Teknik Üniversitesi, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Turkey

Approval Date: 2009

Student: MEHMET ÜNLÜ

Co-Supervisor: TAYFUN AKIN, ŞİMŞEK DEMİR

Abstract:

This thesis presents the theory, design, fabrication, and measurement results of novel reconfigurable impedance tuner, phase shifter, and vector modulators using the RF MEMS technology. The presented circuits are based on triple stub topology, and it is shown both theoretically and experimentally in this thesis that it is possible to control the insertion phase and amplitude of the input signal simultaneously using this topology. The presented circuits are implemented using an in-house, surface micromachining fabrication process developed at METU, namely METU RF MEMS Fabrication Process, which is implemented using six masks on quartz substrates. The RF MEMS impedance tuner is designed to operate in 6-20 GHz frequency band, and it covers the Smith Chart with 1331 impedance points. The measurement results of 729 impedance points of the fabricated impedance tuner show that a wide Smith Chart coverage is obtained in the entire band. The RF MEMS phase shifter is designed to cover 0-360 degrees range 10 degree steps at 15 GHz center frequency. The measurement results of the fabricated phase shifter show that the average phase error is 1.7 degrees, the average insertion loss is -3.1 dB, and the average return loss is -19.3 dB for the measured 21 phase states. The phase shifter can also work up to 30 GHz and 40 GHz with average insertion losses of -5 dB and -8 dB, respectively. The designed RF MEMS vector modulator operates in 22.5-27.5 GHz band, and it has 3 amplitude and 8 phase states. The measurement results of the fabricated vector modulator show that the amplitude error is 0.5 dB, the phase error is 4 degrees, and the return loss is -15 dB on average among the 24 measured states at each of 22.5, 25, and 27.5 GHz frequencies.