Effects of instructions based on cognitive bridging and cognitive conflict on 9th grade students‘ understanding of force and motion, epistemological beliefs, and self-efficacy


Thesis Type: Doctorate

Institution Of The Thesis: Orta Doğu Teknik Üniversitesi, Faculty of Education, Mathematics and Science Education, Turkey

Approval Date: 2013

Student: İBRAHİM YAMAN

Supervisor: ÖMER FARUK ÖZDEMİR

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to compare the effects of the instructions based on cognitive bridging and cognitive conflict approaches and gender on 9th grade students‘ conceptual understanding of force and motion, self-efficacy, and epistemological beliefs. The study was conducted with a sample of 206 students in two different schools. The instructional method (traditional, cognitive conflict, and cognitive bridging) and students‘ gender were used as independent variables in a 3x2 factorial design. Within this design, three treatment groups were constructed, one was control group with no researcher intervention and the other two were used as experimental groups. In one of the experimental groups, students received cognitive bridging instruction and students in the other group received cognitive conflict instruction. Pretests and posttests were administered to assess students‘ conceptual understanding of force and motion, self-efficacy, and epistemological beliefs. Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) was used to explore the main effects of teaching methods and gender, and possible interactions between them. The results showed that teaching method had a significant effect on students‘ conceptual understanding of force and motion in favor of experimental groups. Nevertheless, no significant difference was detected between the effects of cognitive conflict and cognitive bridging. There was no significant difference between male and female students either on the dependent variables of conceptual understandings of force and motion, self-efficacy, and epistemological beliefs. Finally, the present study couldn‘t capture any significant interaction between teaching method and gender on the combined dependent variables.